Monday, 18 December 2017

UN in your language

1 in 2 people living with HIV in Europe is diagnosed late

Cover of a new report published by UN Aids on the occasion of World Aids Day.

The WHO European Region is the only region worldwide where the number of new HIV infections is rising. With more than 160 000 people newly diagnosed with HIV across the Region, including more than 29 000 new cases from the European Union and European Economic Area (EU/EEA), this trend continued in 2016. One reason for this worrying trend: over half (51%) of the reported HIV diagnoses happen in the later stages of infection.

“The HIV epidemic continues to rise at an alarming pace in the European Region, mostly in its eastern part, which is home to almost 80% of the 160 000 new HIV diagnoses. This is the highest number of new cases ever recorded in one year. If this trend persists, we will not be able to achieve the Sustainable Development Goal target of ending the HIV epidemic by 2030,” warned Dr Zsuzsanna Jakab, WHO Regional Director for Europe in a statement on the occasion of World Aids Day 2017, 1 December. 

Testing people late, particularly those at higher risk of infection, results in late treatment and further contributes to the ongoing spread of HIV. “The later people are diagnosed, the more likely they are to develop AIDS, thus leading to more suffering and death. On World AIDS Day, I urge all countries to take action now to reverse the HIV epidemic in Europe,” adds Dr. Jakab.

Dr Andrea Ammon, the director of the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) said that the data shows that Europe needs to do more in its HIV response.. “On average, it takes a person about 3 years from the time of infection until they are diagnosed, which is far too long. This results in poorer long-term health outcomes for the many people who are diagnosed late and also increases the risk for onward HIV transmission.”

Two-thirds, or 68%,of the new AIDS diagnoses in the EU/EEA happened only within three months after the HIV diagnosis, which indicates that these people have had the infection for many years previously.

Men and boys: the blindspot

On World AIDS Day, UNAIDS warns that men are less likely to access HIV treatment and more likely to die of AIDS-related illnesses .A  new report published today shows that men are less likely to take an HIV test, less likely to access antiretroviral therapy and more likely to die of AIDS-related illnesses than women.  Globally less than half of men living with HIV are on treatment, compared to 60% of women. Studies show that men are more likely than women to start treatment late, to interrupt treatment and to be lost to treatment follow-up.

“Addressing the inequalities that put women and girls at risk of HIV is at the forefront of the AIDS response,” said Michel Sidibé, Executive Director of UNAIDS. “but here is a blind spot for men—men are not using services to prevent HIV or to test for HIV and are not accessing treatment on the scale that women are.”

 

Social Media

Facebook R dark blue 150px  TwitterBird R dark blue 150px  Vimeo R dark blue 150px  Youtube R dark blue 150px  Instagram R dark blue 150px
>> All our channels

externallinks-icon120x120External link:

securitycouncilreport

infoPoint32x32 Dblue Latest Products:

New Backgrounders:
          Myanmar
          Refugees and Migrants
          Sustainable Development Goals (SGDs)
 

Library Newsletter - November 2017
(new websites, information material & publications)

UN Press & Media Contacts

externallinks-icon120x120External link (non-UN):

whatsinblue

When the Security Council approaches the final stage of negotiation of a draft resolution the text is printed in blue... What's in Blue helps interested UN readers keep up with what might soon be "in blue".